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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Trusting our Friends – the Dilemma



There are people who argue that the Koran, the Muslim bible, is a book of peace.  Having read this ‘book of peace’ I have found that it incites the faithful to hatred for those that reject Islam and justifies eternal warfare against those of us of inferior faith. Earlier verses are tinged with tolerance but this is almost certainly because it was written at a time when the faithful were insufficiently strong to impose their will on the majority.  The earlier verses are therefore prescriptive of conquest by deception. The Doctrine of Abrogation states however that earlier verses are cancelled by the later contradictory verses.  Most of these latter verses are both militant and oppressive towards non-Muslims.

“Let not believers take disbelievers as allies (friends)” (Koran 3:28)

“O you who have believed, do not take the Jews and the Christians as allies (friends)” (Koran 5:51)

“Fight those who do not believe in Allah or in the Last day …and who do not adopt the religion of truth [i.e. Islam]..” (Koran 9:29)

Prejudice is the true barrier to peace. 1,400 years of Islamic history ridicules the infidel nation.  Islam is an Arab blueprint for domination and central to Arab self-understanding; in order to be a true Arab one must also be a Muslim.  Edward Said (the father of Occidentalism) in one of his rare moments of public honesty stated that to genuinely experience the ‘joy’ of being ‘Arab’ it was preferable that one was also a Muslim.

How does this affect the Arab – Israeli conflict and the conduct of its Arab and LibLeft protagonists?  Indoctrination as a substitute for scholarship clouds any issue and effectively proscribes serious debate.  Cultural programming has sanitised Arab colonial crimes so effectively, it has occluded any discussion.  But then, it was pointed out in a recent article that Islamic Turkey is incapable of apologising for its genocide of Armenians and Kurds and its crimes against the Greek nation.   It is not just the Arab world for which the concept of guilt is unidirectional.

It is assumed that that which does not create advantage for the faithful and does not assist in imposing Islam on infidel individuals and nations, is of no value for study or, cultural retention. It is the death of intellectualism and a return to darkness.

But it is also the key to understanding the Arab and the Muslim antisemitic mindset.

The Jewish community has an unbroken presence in the Holy Land in spite of Arab attempts at eradicating their history.  Israel has been victim to the threat of, if not actual ethnic persecution for all of Islamic history.  For this reason Hebron was ethnically cleansed of its ancient Jewish community in 1929.  Jewish communities throughout Israel have suffered ethnic persecution since its conquest by Muhammad’s forces was completed in 638 AD.  Those people who for political or religious reasons have closed their hearts as well their minds to any evidence to the contrary, accept the revisionist history that denies any connection between Jews and Israel.  Therefore, by logical furtherance of this argument, they also deny the Christian connection to the Holy Land (unless they subscribe to a racist concept of supercessionism).

The constant threat of being stoned or murdered circumscribed then as it does today, every activity carried out by Jewish communities and not just in Israel but anywhere that Islam is present.  It is not something new as the Left tries to tell us, it is not a post 1948 phenomenon.

The reason that Jewish Israeli settlements are fenced-in is the same reason that every home owner possesses a fence, it defines ownership. But whereas fencing harks back to a romanticised era of knights, castles and moats, Israel’s gated communities are imperfectly prevented from being slaughtered down to the last baby by walls and wire fences.  The Boston bombers created IED’s (improvised explosive devices) of malevolent intent. Their construction was meant to cause indiscriminate carnage. Similar IED’s were a casual but deadly visitor in Israel’s public places before the construction of the barrier that separates it from its Palestinian Arab enemy.

The conflict between Israel, and Arab Muslims (and some Christians) has always been in its essence a refusal to grant Jews equal rights.  The right to Jewish self-determination was the subject of discussion between Jews in British Mandate Palestine and Arab leaders for over twenty years prior to independence but it was an idea with no currency whatsoever amongst Arab leaders.  The kernel within Zionism was Jewish self-determination but it also assumed equality for everyone else. Its failure was in its idealised, romantic view of the peaceful Arab, that same Arab who, it was presumed, would enthusiastically embrace his Jewish brothers and sisters, in peaceful co-existence. It was a dreamy universalism that had no anchor in the reality of Arab identity and in the casual cruelty of that identity.

300 Jewish civilians were murdered by Palestinians between the declared ceasefire of 1949 and 1956.  Arab bellicosity and threats of extermination culminated in the 6-Day War and Israel’s re-taking of Jerusalem.  Cycles of violence and hatred expressed internationally did not start with conquest in 1967.

In a Jewish Chronicle article of the 5th of April the title summarised what has always been the issue: “Hatred needs no context.” But if we need it then we have inspiration in the form of incitement in the mosques, in schools and on their TV screens. We have the Koran and Hadith from which prayer leaders across the globe quote with enthusiasm. Hateful statements from leaders and senior government figures in both Egypt and Turkey do no more than mirror the ‘holy’ writings of Islam.

And meanwhile, the European Union and various United Nation agencies fund quasi-Nazi activity without a moment of shame.

And then we are told to trust, and to show faith in politicians and nations whose track record towards us is at best demonic.

Zionist values of yearning for peace and tolerance towards minorities will suffer as a result of drawn out experience of war and terror. Delegitimisation does not help to encourage trust. Prolonged battering cannot encourage faith.

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